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. airports are tradod the stock exchange and hps the government and services as well >> carroll. i tell you, i use the roads in the country and i go skidding on two to school and i am part of the reason there is it pot holes it makes sense to charge me more. >> i think that is a linier solution to a complex problem. if you have a suv . i am with johnathon. why can't they add value instead of taxing us. i am in illinois if you add a chicago bears and hello kitty on those license plates. people pay up for that . offer us something that why would be willing to buy and give them extra revenue . maybe i am spending to much time with the pren pren. >> i think we need to. i spepped a lot of time, too. it is it incredible. >> and there i no other promosal thats serious . you have to admit one thing. somebody has to pay for just wait . julian's poi. if you go anywhere else in the world. the fuel tax is three dollars a gallon. maybe we should raise it. >> of course we should raise it if it makes sense. there are plenty of tollroads. >> that is it a used tax in itself. it is it another huge tax and ma
of climate change. >> oh dear. susan? >> federal government rate of the gibson guitar factory. they confiscated the merchandise because a small business took some wood -- that was the incorrect level of thickness. >> interesting. what a loss. >> the worst political theater? how the right turned benghazi tragedy into theater of the absurd. >> are you reading that now? >> i wanted to get it right and concise. >> listen to me now and watch this. understood reported story of 2012 the bright side of mexico. the bright side of mexico. but particularly its economy. you call mexico went down to a failed state on the program. now in the midst of a manufacturing rebound be exports up to 14%. up from 11%. creating jobs, boosting gdp and drawing mexican immigrants from the united states back home. okay. the most overreported story of 2012. pat? >> the election of 2012 primary and general election and the fiscal cliff. >> eleanor? >> political gaffes. i like to fire people. you didn't build that, corporations are people too my friend. and -- the -- what is it? the private sector is doing j
the government announcement today on reducing the number of troops in afghanistan during 2013. we await the defense secretary's statement -- can the prime minister tell the house how many troops and civilians will be left with in afghanistan after the 2014 deadline, and whether they will be there under afghan-led command? >> i join the leader of the opposition in welcoming what our troops do. on afghanistan, we have to decisions to make. first of all, the decision about the drawdown between now and the end of 2013, and what the -- of 2014, and what the defense secretary would announce is because of the success of our forces and the afghan national security forces and the fact that we are moving from a man during a battalion level to mentoring at a grade level by the end of 2013, will be able to see troops come home in two relative even steps, leaving about 5200 troops after the end of 2013. compared with the 9000 we have now. it is to pay tribute to the incredible work they have done, tour. this book with particularly -- they were impressed by the afghan national sources -- those who i
acts and other, government properties and government records so people can follow. >> yes, two house committees controlled by the republicans are now investigating the richard windsor issue. i hope they will ask that question. how widespread is this illegal practice? who else has been doing it? let's see those records. there needs to be a wide spread investigation here. and i hope that the republican controlled house of representatives will do a good job of it. tom: i don't even know how do you, that they are not looking around at outside e-mails this is almost a paula brad broadwell, getting someone else involved. finding out where are the e-mails. >> i think it is clear the obama administration, and remember president obama promised his would be the most transparent transparent administration is mystery, we will need cabinet secretaries and other high obama appointees before a commity and swear them, take their testimony under oath where they have used the secret e-mail acouncil account to evad. tom: talking about fact maybe now that president will include west virginia in the co
based on life expectancy. for that we're using a lot of data from the u.s. government, cdc, another company called practice fusion and electronic medical record vendor. and again, what we try to do is make health fun and make the experience of health about exploring this great city that we're in and then showing the long-term health benefits of doing so. right now we're looking for beta users in the city and we'll launch in about a month or two. thank you very much. we're really happy to be here. (applause) >> cool, we're going to do a short panel talking about the state of open data and sort of what specifically some of these companies are doing which you've gotten a brief peek on. again, you're probably familiar with, already know who a lot of these people are. really quick go down and have everyone introduce them self. >> hello,ishv. my name is ian kalen, hottved by the department of energy and i support thuous us chief technology officer todd park who is not the cto, but assistant to the president. >> and i'm peter hirschberg, run publicly a dozen hack-a-thon, [speaker not under
school cars and space ships. >> entrepreneurs do what only governments did before. >> maybe cities will be built on water flow from big government. >> this is outside the united states jurisdiction. >> life gets better because ideas have sex. >> wait, ideas have sex? >> yes. >> ideas spread. when they meet they can mate. >> because of that we live in a wonderful world. that is our show tonight >> now, john stossel. ♪ i think to myself ♪ what wonderful world >> what a wonderful world? what are they talking about? all we hear from the media is doom, unemployment, pollution, social conflict, all the things exist but couldn't once in a while someone put it in perspective? this man did that. i usually don't like to put on swedish public health professionals or danish public health professionals they put you to sleep but this gentleman has caught the world's attention because he gave a tech talk, technology entertainment design, many are boring but his talk has been viewed 100,000 times. here is part of it. >> i was only four years old when i saw my motherlode the washing machine r t
. recall that in past years a couple decades ago when we became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan, we cut off militaryoff assistance to the pakistani military and that led to very negative consequences so while some of these choices are very difficult, i am inclined in that direction of greater rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there's any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: you talk about declining powers, does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report i just referred to talk about the day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but the so-called first among equals.t m they project around 2030. your thoughts and your reckoning on whether or not you agree with that, they will come if not declining of other powers. >> i certainly think since the financial crisis back in 2007, 2008, there has been a tendency to write this down, if you will, but i think many of those assessmentsit have been unduly pessimistic and even downright wrong at times. we are still the most powerful economy in the wo
the exchange, leaving it up to t federal government government to implement exchanges. the president's health care law was so unpopular when the president signed it ino law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of e legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between those who want the islamic state, governed by sharia law, and those who oppose it. andrew boston this year. the professor and the author of the new book "sharia versus freedom." in the nation's credit rating is at risk. serious proposals to reduce the deficit and really end our national debt. potentially, a significant blow to the obamacare controversial o contraceptive mandate. the eighth circuit court of appeals in the
before they went into government. but about the queen and the family and lifting the vail. you thrift veil and this is an extraordinary world we've never seen inside of. so "the queen r queen" came directly from the deal. >> what did tony blair think of it? >> next question. >> i want to know president obama said "homeland" is his favorite show. my question is when you're dealing with live, real people who you are portraying or in the case of "homeland" or "24" when you're trying to deal with agencies that you are representing, what is that interaction like? we were talking a little bit in the room next door, maybe you can answer michael, how is tony blair's perception changed as a result of those films or the queen's perception changed in the minds of the public then we can talk about "homeland" and "24"? >> there are many things that you realize that you are working with when you do a film or a tv show that is -- has so much political emphasis. and one of the things is inevitably you come up against the agenda of people in terms of the agendas they have for looking at and judging po
-given, or the laws given from god to the people and it bubbles up word to the rumors. it gives us the government of the people, by the people and for the people that lincoln referred to. common-law stand in stark opposition to almost every other nation on earth that has developed some form of civil law come in which law trickles down from the top. both germany and england had common-law for a while, but by the 20th century both have more or less abandoned it. germany more so than england. therefore, by the end of world war ii, when you have unloaded however unwillingly its colonies, those colonies were themselves designed on principles of civil law. us, the first two pillars taken together mean that a christian, protestant religion influenced and shaped everything about american foundation of laws and defined its system of personnel rights. it wasn't just that the united states was a democratic republic, but that the very premises of what a democratic republic meant were likely to be far different in the united states than anywhere else. the second of, third of the pillars involves economic free
begin to realize they need a stronger federal government to reroute archons dictation. many, many americans were posted to comp dictation and he became the anti-federalist. they were the federalist and anti-federalist, bitterly opposed to each other from the very beginning, from the signing of the constitution. the anti-federalist gradually became no as republican and democrat republicans. so when john quincy adams was running for office, you now how the republicans or democrat republicans running against the federalist and he was the last of the federalists. the federalist rambis from the beginning, washington and the people who ran the country were really friendly elite. the constitution only other property owners. gradually universal suffrage came in, not universal involving women. don't get your hopes up too high it was white male suffrage, but she didn't have to be a property owner and that was what pushed to the elite out of power. adams, jefferson, monroe's, all these great plantation owners and property owners and elite leaders really permitted the growth of jacksonian dem
the government can just let people build and build and build without some sort. of sort host: thank you. guest: you make a good point, but urban development in florida occupies 10% of the state. most of the -- most of the everglades is protected by state parks. if people want to protect more land, they could buy land and put it under conservation easily, but there is plenty of land available sphere without impacting the everglades in the awkward first. to say that we should confine people to 10% of the state, when you have one of the 3 or four most heavily populated states, means you are seeing newcomers are not welcome, existing renters can not buy houses, our children cannot buy houses. that is not the american dream, to stand in the way of our future. host: the book is entitled "american nightmare -- how government undermines the dream of homeownership. this is from drake cinders -- what land use restrictions would you approve of? guest: a buy support local homeowners imposing their own -- i would support local homeowners' imposing their own restrictions. this is how it works in houston, w
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
. and then came this moment. november 9th, big debate, here he is trying to remember the three government agencies he wants to get rid of. let's watch. >> and i will tell you, it's three agencies of government when i get there that are gone. commerce, education and the -- what's the third one there? let's see. >> five. >> oh, five. okay, commerce, education and the, um, um -- >> epa? >> epa. there you go. >> seriously, is epa the one you're talking about? >> no, sir, no, sir. we're talking about the, um, agencies of government. epa needs to be rebuilt. >> but you can't name the third one? >> the third agency of government, i would do away with education, the commerce, and let's see. i can't. the third one, i can't. sorry. oops. >> he must have had a whole lot of help. >> you can't bring notes with you, they start scribbling the notes. >> up next, the right wing's most outrageous conspiracy theories are m coing up. this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] what are happy kids made of? bikes and balloons, wholesome noodles on spoons. a kite, a breeze, a dunk of grilled cheese. c
will govern more in the mode of his first two years when he was governor of massachusetts? they uniformly said they'd be disappointed and in fact labrador one of the stars of the tea party featured in my book said there would be an insurrection. people say we have been really boisterous. you have seen nothing yet. if president romney behaves like a conservative it's going to be the death of the republican party. >> i am just going to let that sit there for a second and let that sink right in. [laughter] let's come back to the leadership. i want to ask you specifically as individuals and as a threesome that way they do or do not work well together, boehner cantor and mccarthy. characterize each one in shorthand beginning with speaker boehner. >> john boehner is a washington lifer and was not the obvious choice to be leading this sort of tea party crafts. nonetheless you can see the tea party phenomenon for the trade -- freight train that it was an elected to be on the train rather than underneath it. speaker boehner campaigned heavily for a number of the tea party freshman andy also you know be
hard-earned profit. not giving them to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. instead they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative ellison, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. melissa: but you say hard-earned dollars. congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give the money they have is my money taken from me. it is companies money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. exxon is hanging on to earnings, rather these are deductions rather than sending even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money that is exxon's money hanging on to but they're not taking money back. they're hanging onto the m
equipment and furnishings, her insurance denied her claim a she got no lp from the government. take a look at ths. they got her back in the business. it pretty awesome, right? the party of procrastination can take a lesson from the small-business oer in staten island, w york. congress has nothing to show for itself after two years. coming up next, how the massive gains in the fiscal cliff could impact your 401k and the economy. stay with us gerri: you make it, they take it. 23.8% is the raise that policymakers will see on capital gains. chris edwards joins me now. he is director for tax policy studies at the cato institute. i would like to show people what we're talking about. he gets confusing for people. we have a current tax rate, 15%. on january 1, the capital gains tax ra will jump to 23.8%. i talked to a lot of my frien and they say that's not a big dumb. what you say? >> it is a big jump. if you add state taxes on top of that, the united states will be up to 20%. our major trading partners, britain and europe and canada -- they are oly 16%. so there is a very good reason why just ab
many, many years. get the idea that somehow you can create this post a tribal big tent government that will pacify the country, i think is a bit of a dream. we will continue to have a messy chaotic future there for some time to come, unfortunately. >> rajiv, when we over in afghanistan to write this book? book? book? >> i traveled the initial in early 2000. i made 15 trips from 2009 through this year, many of them several weeks at a time. i traveled all over the country, but i emphasize my time in the south. i spent a lot of time with our military forces, with u.s. marines into helmand province, with army soldiers in kandahar, with american diplomats and reconstruction workers, and with the afghan people. traveled around by helicopter, by my is that trucks, pickup trucks, by donkey, and really -- >> we able to get out on your own? >> yes. fortunately, though i'm an american, i'm blessed with dark skin and this beard. >> did that make a difference? >> it did make a difference. it allowed me to blend in perhaps in ways it would be more difficult for you to do in kandahar. >> rajiv c
an actual all-time high again. anyway, among the catalysts, a new pro-business government preparing to assume leadership, incoming prime minister shinzo abe. what is it, 50,000 that it has to get to? >> 39,000 i believe is the peak. >> who's counting, right? that's a ways off. >> yeah. far away. >> shinzo abe has been putting pressure on the bank of japan to raise its inflation target in hopes of extricating the country from two decades of deflation. i guess if you just raised the target -- >> that would help. >> okay. >> it doesn't matter what your target is if you can't hit it. >> we found that out here. >>> meantime, in europe markets are closed for the boxing day holiday. seems weird to do it just for a bunch of people to -- >> box up the gifts and return them. >> it's not a -- >> bad, i know. >> it is boxing. what kind of boxing are we -- boxer rebellion? >> i've never understood boxing day. >> we have to look it up. >> i literally have no idea. >> or it's on google. no, is there anything on google that is different? let me see. just a regular -- >> is there their our way to fi
pay increases that the president approved . >> no credibility. i am on the government and the need help. gerri: you make a good point. if there is some kind of real resolution, can we see some kind of recovery in the economy? what the markets grade whatever deal comes out? i can't imagine -- i guess i'm just being negative. cutting entitlement spending in all the things we really need to do like making the tax system more fair and easy to understand you just cross your arms. >> my body language. if we have this deal we will not get tax reform. we will not give genuine spending cuts because with this president to mike cutting down the republicans piece by piece a little bit at a time. this is their last stand outside atlanta. think of atlanta as american capitalism. if they give in tonight, if they give in on monday and pass these tax increases, the president will get what he wants. there will be deficit reduction, and the next president will inherit the kind of situation that today characterizes come by once a greece, too extreme, but i would say italy. holy irresponsible for any r
to be gathering some steam but washington, government, congress in particular is the single greatest impediment. it's a rational decision. >> get the act together. john avlon, thank you, my friend. don, it's a lot of intangibles here, don. this is the thing we have to think about. it's not just the tangibles of how much your taxes might go up or how much this might go down. it's the intangible of confidence. it's trust. you lose somebody's trust, how long does it take to get it back. it doesn't just come back tomorrow because you vote on something. >> i can't believe mitch mcconnell was there all day yesterday. >> it's crazy. >> he's working on a saturday. i never work on a saturday. wait a minute, i work every saturday. >> you get your job done. you don't get to tell your bosses, i'm going to do this another time. i'll get down to it in 516 days. >> but one day, one day i will be able to do that, at least i'd like to think that. >>> moving on, at the edge of the fiscal cliff, will the economy get sucked back into a recession or is a compromise possible? words of wisdom from a wall street journ
this is a broader issue about western democracy. unless the markets do put governments under pressure, it's not easy to come up with such tough positions and i suspect that is going to be the case. it will be a recurring theme through the year, i suspect. >> and that's what i was going to suggest, this idea that we're going to come up with cliff after cliff after cliff, that maybe we're into a whole year of cliff diving, your expectation, let's say we get through the cliff with a baby deal. we've had still a number of economists come on this set and talk about how we could still be -- maybe not in a recession, but continue to see a slowdown. >> well, the other way i've been trying to think about the past 24 hours, you look at the private sector, there are two sources of great encouragement for the u.s. economy, it seems to me. one is the domestic housing story. and the second is, of course, the remarkable thing going on with energy based around shale, gas and oil. if these two sources of strength persist, you know, is the disappointment about the cliff enough to negate those two things? i suspect th
this point, rahm emanuel i say the republican party steeply provided to turn this small government land and no government land. there is a truth that not far. i am told we are now at our time. i want mickey to come back with a few closing comments. a part of this but that hasn't gotten as much attention in season mention that i like the bromides we should ignore chapter, which i would reach of the political system will collect no, no. third party to the, no. budget amendment say no. term limits they say no and public financing of elections no. but then i have a whole bunch of things they say yes to and i propose we have an election between the shadow congress and the current congress and then we can see who wins. so let me invite everybody to do closing comments. >> just going down a couple of these. does this represent the republican party as a whole. as citizens just said no, but it does represent is who vote in primaries. so it's a matter of you can't he on the ballot. every state in the united states has a sore looser law from which means if you cluster primary come you can't appear
. that will be a result of the federal government beginning a deleveraging process. something that is been well underway in the private sector for a long time. i think the result will be very good. i just think we need to get beyond all of this uncertainty with washington and in the private sector can go above doing its business. i think that outlook is good. shibani: i think a lot of us are looking forward to this uncertainty. we have debt ceilings. we also have a budget to get through. how do you position yourself? what sectors or stocks do think we'll be able to hold out anymore stable fashion? >> first of all, i think the second half will be a stronger one. in the short run, while that is going on, i think somebody's defensive sectors may still provide a good place to be. they will continue to be attractive. if you look at the market today, it is telling you how things are likely to perform in the second half. you see, for example, materials, technology, industrials doing very well. i think those will be the real eaters in the second half of the year. shibani: it will not happen as robustly here in
staff and government employees. there is one person in particular, one person that tom putnam and i would like to acknowledge. and it isn't archivist that has been overseeing the classification of these recordings and who knows more about these 265 hours of president can '80s taped conversation than any other american. so i ask that you please join us in thanking and acknowledging his work here at the kennedy library. [applause] we have a wonderful panel with us tonight. joining us for tonight's discussion as historian ted winters, who so carefully selected the most compelling of his remarkable recordings and wrote detailed annotations of the transcripts. with us also is owen fitzpatrick, a professor of history at the university of new hampshire, also a wonderful and frequent contributor kennedy form. my colleague and friend, tom putnam, who brings such energy to library's mission of preserving our nation's history. and our good friend we always love having with us, john. the president used a dictaphone to record his personal observations following key meetings and events. we though
the nation's problems, to do what we sent you to washington to do, which is to govern, and here we are with a countdown clock at the bottom, ten hours, 51 minutes, and 34 seconds to get something done that should have gotten done, could have gotten done months ago. a lot of people are scratching their heads wishing, hoping that, you know, at some point congress will get et cetera act together. we do have a new congress coming back in. we keep talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. there are consequences for inaction if that countdown clock gets to zero and there's no deal and no deal has been reached. >> jonathan, thank you. to your point, it's remarkable to me that what we're debating is exactly what we were debating six months ago. it's not as though something has happened recently. this is the debate we've been having or the debate we haven't been having making it all the more remarkable that we have a countdown clock for it. thank you. >> that's right. >> a deal on the fiscal cliff may be at hand, but there's still a lot to do, and not a lot of time to do it. delaware democr
among other factors the political brinksmanship of recent months that highlights america's governance becoming less stable, less effective, and less predictable. we believe this characterization still holds. do you know this congress, your congress, has done more harm than good? do you feel embarrassed being part of a congress that ranks up there with the do-nothing congresses of all time? >> i think america should be embarrassed by its leadership in washington, d.c. but that extends to the white house, senate, and house of representatives. this has been the most predictable disaster coming at us for a number of years, and certainly months. and the fact that we have been unable to do things and instead worried about our next elections instead of the next generation of americans, i think it's sinful and i hope that people turn out those who have been responsible for it. >> congressman, you're a straight shooter, we always appreciate you coming "outfront." >>> next, mixed feelings about gun control. most americans support a ban on assault weapons but also support the nra. >>> plus, alle
to be part of the deliberative process. he heads an entirely separate branch of government with an altogether different purpose. i think we need to go back to the way the government was designed to operate, and that is the deliberative function, in the legislative branch, both the house and the senate, acting independently. and then resolving their differences through conference. that process works, it works very well. this business of a couple of legislative leaders and the president going behind closed doors, coming up with some clever scheme, and then dropping it in the laps of the congress for a take it or leave it vote produces bad policy. in fact, bad process always produces bad policy, and that's what we're seeing. >> congressman, we've been seeing virtually no progress to date, but i hope folks have your optimism about not going over the cliff because of the disastrous implications. congressman mcclintock, thanks for coming on. >>> chuck hagel hasn't even been formally nominated to be the next defense secretary, and he's already taking right hooks from members of his own party, but do
fiscal cliff deal. meantime, treasury warns the government will hit its legal borrowing limit by monday. it's thursday, december 27th, 2012 and "squawk box" begins right now. >>> good morning and welcome to "squawk box" here on cnbc. i'm andrew ross sorkin along with joe kernen. becky continues to have the day off today. our guest host today is bob broska. house speaker john boehner urging the senate to come up with a passable fiscal cliff solution. he's promising to at least consider any bill that the upper chamber produces. senate majority leader harry reid now expected to base any legislation on a bill passed earlier this year to continue tax breaks for households will incomes below $250,000. a senate bill would likely contain an extension of expiring unemployment benefits. and the other big news of the morning, treasury secretary tim geithner unveiling a plan to buy time under the debt ceiling. in a letter to congress, geithner saying that treasury is going to begin taking steps this week to delay hitting the government's 16$16.4 trillion borrowing limit. treasury will tak
.6 trillion the u.s. government spent last year, unless congress reaches a deal when the new year hits. so too will the fiscal cliff. $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts. it is supposed to be automatic. but now republicans are suggesting a delay, the president just spoke trying to add pressure to congress to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. listen. >> my preference would have been to solve all these problems in the context of a larger agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain, whatever you want to call it, that solves our deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way that doesn't just deal with the taxes, but deals with the spending in a balanced way, so that we can put all this behind us focusing on growing our economy. but with this congress, that was obviously a little too much to hope for at this time. >> let's turn now to chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. let's talk a little bit about the outlines of the deal, the fact that the president came out to make his case and try to push this thing over the finish line. what does the white house have to do to
geithner sent a letter to harry reid, the senate majority leader, saying the united states government will hit its statutory debt limit on december 31st. that is the same day that we would go over the fiscal cliff. now the treasury has certain steps they can take to avoid breaching the debt ceiling that will carry the government through february or march, but at the moment in a technical sense treasury secretary geithner is telling the congress we're hitting the debt ceiling at the end of this year which is the part of the, as i mentioned, part of an effort to get congress to step in and act, not only on the fiscal cliff but on the debt ceiling, bill. >> thanks very much for the breaking news. we'll keep monitoring the situation. thanks, john harwood. a look now at financial sector and whether or not you should put your money in the banks. >> 12 months ago there was a lot of buzz about the regionals, but now it's the big banks that have done really, really well. we have the president and ceo at bell rock capital and jeffrey hart. welcome back. >> cassandra, how did we get that wrong,
should have stayed there. i think the president should have stayed there. i think the government should have stayed in place and kept working on it. as a freshman member of the congress, i don't have the pull or the power to say when we're going to be there, when we're not, but at the u.s. house of representatives has acted, we're waiting for the senate to act and i believe that as soon as they act, we'll be back in town to find some forge, some pathway forward. >> well, a senior white house official told cnn tonight to that point, they said we believe strongly a reasonable package can get majorities in both houses. the only thing that would prevent it is if speaker mcconnell and boehner don't cooperate rate. do you think mcconnell and boehner are in the mood to cooperate with president obama? >> i do believe they're in a mood to cooperate. speaker boehner's talked for a very lopg time about a grand bargain, a big deal, about trying to find some major solution going forward. but the senate hasn't acted on anything, so i think we have to be careful on just placing the blame on mcconnell
value, at the turn of the 20th century where government spending was 9% of gdp, we're now at 25%. there are some that say, take what we give you and retrofit government to the size of 19% or 20%. do that first. he just wants to shrink what it's grown to, this unwielding federal government that -- don't you think 25% needs to come down? >> well, part of that is cyclical. >> okay. so at 3%? >> 21, 22. >> i would say 22. >> so we have to get it down to 20.5. >> the three big beasts in the budget remain medicare/medicaid, social security and defense. you have to cut almost everything else to zero to get close to balance or to make a big difference. so i think in today's world, given that those entitlements, even if you reform them and cut back back will increase as people like us eventually retire. it seems to me that sizing the government for something around 22 or so is probably doable. but not easy to get to. because you still have to have major cuts and major long titlement reform to get there. >> you see one of the major ceo guys, and i'm not going to quote which one, said yest
with the sequester of last week and spread those cuts across the board to other facets of government as well. not just military and medicare. we really have to wait and see. pressure is on the senate to come up with a product, to take it to the floor, to sell it it to its members where the senate would be comfortable passing something and we really haven't seen anything publicly where the senate might be at. so this is a frustrating for a lot of folks across the country and of course for members here in washington. because we're even kind of away from all of the negotiating and seeing what the senate is even talking about. >> what are you hearing from constituents today? we can see from the stock market's reaction when they thought there was a deal that might be announced at 1:30 when the president makes his remarks, which we will see here on power lunch, we add huge spike in the dow jones industrial average. now that things are cooling off, the mark set giving back a lot of that. so wall street wants a deal. what are your constituents telling you? >> my constituents are concerned about the
, and more. some say the rules do not go far enough. the pro-government is making it easier for companies to get approval to offer inflight internet service. there is still no word on when passengers will be able to use electronic devices during takeoff and landing. the big apple is planning the attack apple for its rise in climate -- in crime. an increase in fact of apple device is more than increases -- more than covers the increase in major crimes. iphones and ipads are the major targets. zynga as putting petville in the pund. ound. (vo) sometimes the big plan doesn't work. and the perfect life turns out to be not so perfect. you start fresh. new city. new job. new everything. it's exciting, and scary at the same time. and some days you think, "i can't do this on my own." but then...i went to suntrust. they helped me figure things out. and before you know it i am doing it... (anncr) at suntrust, helping people shine is what we do. join the thousands who are switching to suntrust's award-winning service. >> kai, my name is bernie, i'm f
, and will be for the economy in 2013. finally, did you see this amusing story? u.s. government is put on a negative watch by china? by china? the credit rating agency in china put them on the u.s. government debt on a negative rating at this point. negative watch. this, of course, was supposedly independent rating agency created in china to try to rival moody's and s&p and fitch's. that's getting interesting play out there. their independence, of course, greatly in question. guys, back to you. >> bob, get a lozenge, will you? >> sorry about that. >> let's head to the pits. good morning, rick. >> good morning, melissa lee. well, no surprise we're still hovering in the 170s in the ten-year. but maybe something interesting. you know, on the floor we call it the growth dividend. if you look at a chart for our ten-year starting on july 26th, and i pick july 26th because that was mario draghi's big day. he said anything it takes. as you look at our rates over that period, then look at the boon rates over that period. you can see that the growth/disparity, our yields are higher in that formation than boon yield
. in january the supreme court ruled that before the government places a gps tracking device on your vehicle it has to get a search warrant. four months later it said that children conceived through in-vitro are not automatically entitled to benefits after the death of a parents. what the court could look like from here. doug burns a former federal prosecutor and criminal defense attorney. and john manweli, a former criminal defense attorney. waoepl mawaoepl may not influence that the high court cases influence people practicing law day-to-day. doug -rpbgs tel tell me your thoughts on the healthcare. >> a lot of the people ran out of building saying it's been struck down. it was struck down on commerce clause grounds and the necessary and proper clause grounds. jaime: it had to be. >> there it was on page 10 that it was being upheld as a tax which i agree w. the long and short of it was it's the same analysis that we rendered all yearlong. it's 2700 pages long, i'm not sure anybody understan understands. i asked a friend of mine who is a physician can you tell me what is in the health code.
of a government-insured reverse mortgage. it will eliminate your monthly mortgage payments and give you tax-free cash from the equity in your home. and here's the best part -- you still own your home. take control of your retirement today. ♪ ♪ >>> the defense industry sure to be affected if we go over the fiscal cliff in just three days because of those automatic spending cuts to the industry. our jane welles has a look at what's ahead for defense in 2013. >> reporter: as the u.s. leaves the fog of war, the defense industry enters the fog of deficits. no industry is more vulnerable to the budget acts, and here are three predictions for 2013. first, the f-35, lockheed's joint strike fighter will be just fine. the most expensive program in history has been hit with cost overruns and production delays and concern from foreign buyers over its price. but lockheed and the pentagon have come to terms to buy another round of the jets for nearly $4 billion. morgan stanley calls the f-35 the single most important investment debate over lockheed stock. second, cash will be king. as defense spendin
government, which i think is appropriate and practical, but it seems american interests in the sense that it gives middle easterners of whatever background a sense that the united states has the humanitarian presence in the middle east. it's not all about access to oil or deployment of forces. the americans have been there for 150 years getting to the region and much more prior to call and beneficial ways for the people of the region and not just for us. that's why he wrote the book. i wanted them to know them and the american people to know that story. >> was malcolm curran and what happened to them? >> use of political science professor who left the year before i arrived to work on a phd in east ucla. his parents had been on the faculty at aup and though he had made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a scholar in the middle east, gila home to leave the school during the difficult time when beirut had fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school
living in almost total isolation, a community that is self- contained, that is governed very strictly. there is an oath of entry. it is very much a monastic community. x the congregation of the elect must pledge himself to live according to the rule of theo community, to love all the children of light, and to hate all the children of darkness." >> the essenes are what we might best call an apocalyptic sect of judaism. an apocalyptic sect is one that? thinks of itself as, first of all, the true form of the religion. yt >> by apocalyptic expectation, i mean that some group has a... an apocalupsis in greek-- a revelation that god is going to finally solve the problem of injustice, unrighteousness, evil in the world, by totally eradicating the evil. that's the terrible price of apocalypse; there's going to be %gzm totally eradicating evil-- and we, the good, whoever we are, are going to live with god, be it heaven on earth, or earth in heaven, forever, in justice and holiness and righteousness. >> among the dead sea scrolls, we hear not of just one messiah, but at least two messiahs. som
, across the board cuts to government programs. there's divide on taxes. the white house wants to raise tax rates on people making more than $250,000 a year and republicans want to keep the estate tax from going up. >> if we're not able to reach an agreement, it will be dire. >> reporter: if there's no deal today, the average american family will start the year with a $3400 tax hike. paula and john? >> tahman bradley reporting live from washington this morning. thanks, tahman. happy new year to you. >> reporter: same to you. >>> the president called the shooting at newtown was the worst day of his presidency. and pledged to put his full weight behind legislation aimed at preventing gun violence. he said he was skeptical of the nra's proposal to put armed guards in every school. >>> a bus crash on an oregon highway has killed nine people and injured others. the tour bus lost control on interstate 84 yesterday morning. it happens in a treacherous section of the blue mountains called dead man pass as the bus was heading back to vancouver from las vegas. the driver survived, but was too badly i
geithner says the government may hit its $16.4 trillion borrowing limit on monday. the president will hear about the fiscal cliff problem as well as members of congress return to washington to address the fiscal cliff. talks will take place behind closed doors. no public negotiations set. you have the debt and the fiscal cliff. it's not looking too good right now when it comes to the u.s. economy. >> geithner told congressional leaders that his department is using some accounting measures basically a fancy way of saying they're going to try to free up some cash to hold off, temporarily, this fiscal cliff. but it's still not looking good. >> i don't know about you at home, but kicking the can down the road, this has been happening over and over again. somebody has to make some decisions here. >> it's like in this business, they give you a deadline and you have to hit the deadline. there's no coming in and saying take another ten minutes. it don't work that way in real life. there are americans out there saying, get off your couches, get back to washington, and get the deal done. >> sometime
government troops over control of major cities. >>> andruw jones, free on bone this morning after being arrested outside atlanta on christmas on a battery charge. the gwinnett county detention center tells us there was a domestic dispute with his wife. the center fielder won ten straight gold gloves with the braves. played with the new york yankies last year and recently signed with a team in january pan. >>> shinzo abe has been elected prime minister. he held the same position six years ago but resign because of health problems. he helped his party dominate elections last month. he promised to revive the economy and create a recovery plan for last year's earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster. >>> six days to go before the fiscal cliff deadline and tomorrow could be make or break in determining if we steer clear or go over the edge. president obama is cutting his hawaiian vacation short and is leaving tonight and will be back tomorrow. that is when the house and senate is expected to reconvene. >>> starbucks weighing in with the own fiscal cliff campaign. workers at 120 d.c. area sto
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